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Bizarre Tech: danger skates, singing car and hairy tattoos

In this edition of crazy gadgets, there’s a couple of new, wacky ways to get out and about, and keep your loved one close to you forever.

Electric danger skates

You’re going to need more than just a helmet for these.

Segway-Ninebot, the creator of the famous Segway PT, the two-wheeled, self-balancing personal transporter, is bringing out the Drift W1 e-skates.

They look a bit like a bitesize version of the Segway MiniPro, where you have to use your balance to control the movement of it – there are loads of fail compilations of people getting into some hilarious accidents using the hoverboard-esque personal transportation vehicle. But anyway.

The company, which describes itself as the world leader in commercial-grade, electric, self-balancing personal transportation, has registered more than 800 patents to get these skates on the road, so they’re as stable as possible. But still, if you’ve ever tried to stand on one foot and ended up looking like a drunk flamingo, then I wouldn’t recommend this new product.

Do the Drift W1s come with accessories? Like elbow pads, knee pads ... face pads? Most people, more often than not, are probably going to end up getting a little injured.

Then again, if you’re an avid roller-skater, you’re likely to look as cool as a cucumber, gliding past the regular Joes with the wind in your hair and not a care in the world.

Segway say the e-skates, which are lightweight and easy to carry, bring all the fun you expect from its consumer products line, combined with high-quality engineering. The tyres are designed to improve steering and stability, so you might not die on your commute to work or play.

With the Drift W1s, you can attempt to create a new trend. If you don’t break your nose on the pavement first.

eu-en.segway.com

 

Finnish singing taxi

Want to sing about rollmop herring?

The Fortum Singalong Shuttle – a BMW i3 –  is billed as the world’s first taxi that is paid for by singing. The emission-free rides are courtesy of clean-energy company Fortum, which will give these musical lifts to people at the Ruisrock festival, Finland, in July.

It is common knowledge that everyone likes to belt out their favourite tunes in the car now and again. A lot of us won’t necessarily get paid for our musicality/tone deafness, so being able to earn a free ride using our pipes could have mixed results, like being thrown out of the moving car because you’re making others’ ears bleed.

The company says this mode of transport combines rideshares with Carpool Karaoke. Fortum wants to highlight the wide range of clean-energy solutions available to the public using the Singalong Shuttle, encourage engagement of its customers and society to join the change for a cleaner world, and to live a more sustainable life.

Fortum’s Charge & Drive EV charging network is the largest in the Nordics, with over 2,000 chargers in the region.

The car keeps on moving as long as you continue singing, and is equipped with a sound level meter that tracks the noise level of the fun and emission-free rides. Using an electric car also means passengers of the taxi can listen and belt out their favourite tunes without background noise and carbon emissions.

A little gimmicky, but pretty cute all the same.  

fortum.com/singalongshuttle

 

Hairy tattoos

I got you, under my skin. Permanently.

Swiss start-up SKIN46 is claiming to be able to give you a tattoo made with biogenic material from Elvis Presley. You’d have to pluck a hair from his corpse, but still.

The company is able to create a safe, hygienic, high-quality tattoo ink by breaking down hair into pure personal carbon.

So if you wanted a tattoo of your pet dog, what could be better than using ink made from your pooch’s butt hair?

Take the hair of any loved one, give it to SKIN46, and you can have them with you for the rest of your life. Brings a new meaning to someone getting ‘under your skin’, doesn’t it?

skin46.com

 

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