Jurassic World Alive

‘Jurassic World Alive’ bringing virtual dinosaurs to real-world surroundings

Image credit: Universal Studios/Ludia

The Jurassic World Alive location-based augmented reality (AR) game will allow users to catch, hatch and breed dinosaurs to share and battle with other users.

Although AR applications have been available for years, the technology did not gain wide prominence until the launch of Niantic’s Pokémon Go. The location-based AR game, in which colourful images of Pokémon are overlaid over the user’s real world surroundings, became one of the popular and profitable apps ever, being downloaded over half a billion times by the end of 2016.

Its popularity was such that a number of countries passed legislation to regulate its use, due to concerns about players being so absorbed in the game that they put themselves or others in danger, such as by walking on rail tracks or playing while driving.

Now, Universal Studios and Monteal-based gaming company Ludia have teamed up to create a similar location-based AR game inspired by the Jurassic Park franchise: Jurassic Park Alive.

In this game, players will be encouraged to interact with dinosaurs placed in real-world locations around them. Much like Pokemon Go, Jurassic World Alive will allow players to hunt for dinosaurs by finding them on a map in the app, and sending out a virtual drone to collect samples of DNA, or to collect their eggs.

Once they have collected samples from the wild dinosaurs, they can gain experience to create virtual dinosaurs and hybrids in the lab. Players can take selfies and videos with their favourite dinoaurs, “level up” their dinosaurs to assemble a “perfect dinosaur strike team” and fight alongside other players to “take on dangerous threats in real-time PVP arena battles”.

Hybrid dinosaurs in Jurassic World Alive

Universal Studios/Ludia

Image credit: Universal Studios/Ludia

The game will be launched on Android and iOS in spring, ahead of the release of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom in June.

Riding on the success of Pokémon Go, a number of other AR games inspired by blockbusters are being prepared for release this year, including Ghostbusters World, and Harry Potter: Wizards Unite, which is being developed by Pokémon Go creator, Niantic. Meanwhile, a mixed VR and AR theme park opened last week in Dubai.

While AR is largely used for entertainment purposes, it could also have extensive applications in healthcare – particularly in surgery and patient engagement – in education, and in manufacturing.

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