Competition

Christmas book bundle giveaway: A Very Short Introduction

Struggling to find Christmas inspiration for the engineering and technology fanatics in your life? Relax; we’ve got your stocking fillers covered this year.

To celebrate Christmas in E&T style we are giving five lucky readers the chance to win a fantastic book bundle from the Oxford University Press Very Short Introduction series. These miniature marvels offer to teach the basics of some pretty hefty subjects, in a compact format that slips perfectly inside a stocking. 

Read on for your chance to win a fabulous bundle of all three books listed here. We have five bundles to give away to selected readers of E&T online. Enter the giveaway below by midnight on Friday 8th December to be in with the chance of winning.

The Future: A Very Short Introduction, by Jennifer M. Gidley

An attempt to analyse and condense something which encompasses everything that is yet to come feels like an exercise in failure, and yet I hold in my hands a book which does just this. A wonderfully concise and brilliantly written book, The Future: A Very Short introduction by Jennifer M. Gidley takes a look at the future by travelling into the past – a literal oxymoron if ever there was one. To understand the future, says Gidley, we must look backwards, beginning with the emergence of theories of linear time in Ancient Greece. Within the book Gidley introduces the reader to the future as a concept, exploring prophecies and predictions from throughout history, discussing the potential for machine- vs human-centred futures and highlighting the reality that is ‘multiple futures’.  The future is inevitable, but our treatment of it doesn’t have to be; by exploring ‘the past of the future’ and its links with ‘present-day futures’, says Gidley, we are better prepared to create wiser futures for tomorrow.

Projects: A Very Short Introduction, by Andrew Davies

In this Very Short Introduction Andrew Davies delves into the world of projects. It may sound like a dry subject, but the history of projects is nothing short of fascinating – and a very long history it is too. By definition, a project is any sort of collaborative mission planned to achieve a particular aim, a temporary measure with a limited lifespan. Throughout history mankind has used projects to reform and transform the natural world, creating innovative spaces for people to work, live and play. Throughout the course of this very short introduction Davies references some of the greatest projects of all time, including examples such as the Erie Canal and the Apollo Moon landing, to highlight how different projects are managed and organised to cope with the changing conditions and immense uncertainties unveiled within any form of breakthrough innovation. Moving forward, Davies presents his own ideas for how future projects can be organised to best address the challenges of modern post-industrial societies. If you are considering a career in project management or are already involved in one or more projects and want to know how to improve the system then let this book become your bible. Projects: A Very Short Introduction by Andrew Davies offers a veritable goldmine of insights, anecdotes and analysis of the very basics of project management, showing how it is done, and advising on how it can be done better. 

Big Data: A Very Short Introduction, by Dawn E. Holmes

A very short introduction to a very big subject, Big Data: A Very Short Introduction by Dawn E. Holmes is arguably the most topical of this book series. Big data is everywhere, and not just in the sense that it is constantly being gathered and amalgamated to carry out all manner of market-based and statistical analysis – it is also an immensely overused buzzword, present everywhere from the daily news to popular culture, and all points between. This very short introduction is perfect for anyone who is a little bit baffled by the very concept of big data. Holmes introduces the subject in a format that is both concise and manageable, drawing on the fields of statistics, probability and computer science to illustrate the power of big data in everyday life, the associated security risks of such information falling into the wrong hands, and the issues surrounding the use of big data by companies and businesses today.

If you are fascinated by the future, passionate about projects, or baffled by big data, you’re probably itching to get your hands on a bundle of these latest releases from Oxford University Press. To be in with a chance of winning a set of all three books simply enter our giveaway below.

Terms and conditions 
This giveaway is open to UK entrants only and runs until 08/12/2017 at midnight. There are five sets of three books available. There is no cash alternative and the prize is not transferable. Employees of the IET and their families may not enter. A winner will be picked at random and contacted via email. If they do not respond within 3 days, another winner will be picked. Entrants’ details will be used only in connection with this competition and not retained or passed to any third parties. E&T, as the promoter, reserves the right to cancel or amend the giveaway and these terms and conditions without notice.

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