Bloodhound SSC passes its first test

Preparations for breaking the world land speed record cranked up a notch as Bloodhound SSC made a successful first public outing.

On its first official public outing, Bloodhound SSC put on an impressive and deafening performance for a huge crowd of fans and media at Newquay Airport. This test run, which reached speeds of 210mph, was to assess the actual performance of car compared to its design specifications before moving on to more demanding tests and a possible record attempt next year.

Bloodhound SSC speed trials

Image credit: Stephen Hunt, Spitfire Productions

Although cagey about the precise schedule, Bloodhound SSC is expected to attempt an 800mph run in the South African desert at the end of next year, which would break the existing world land speed record of 763mph. If all goes well then the following year would see an upgraded rocket boost the speed further up to the 1,050mph design limit of the car.

Bloodhound SSC speed trials

Image credit: Stephen Hunt, Spitfire Productions

Bloodhound is propelled by a jet engine, which could take the car up to 600mph by itself, but an additional rocket will be fired on the record-breaking runs when the car is at about 300mph and this will take Bloodhound up to the record speeds.

Bloodhound SSC speed trials

Image credit: Stephen Hunt, Spitfire Productions

After the run in Newquay, Bloodhound’s driver, Andy Green, said: “This car is meant to be doing supersonic speeds in the desert and we are asking it to be a drag racer on an airfield. In spite of that the car did exactly what we wanted. In my opinion, this is the best land-speed car that has ever been created. We have got a car that is working better than expected. It’s faster, more reliable. And the team is just brilliant, they are why this is working so well. The engineers and technicians and scientists who designed and created this car and ran it here today are the ones who deserve credit.”

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