LabView NXG updates the 30 year old software tool for engineers

National Instruments unveils LabView NXG with new code base and v1.0

Image credit: National Instruments

National Instruments revealed the first release of a brand new generation of its popular LabView engineering system design software at its annual customer conference today.

Customers attending the NIWeek event in Austin, Texas, got the first look at LabView NXG 1.0,  “the first in a fast-paced series of releases in the next generation of LabView.”

“Thirty years ago, we released the original version of LabVIEW, designed to help engineers automate their measurement systems without having to learn the esoterica of traditional programming languages. LabVIEW was the ‘nonprogramming’ way to automate a measurement system,” said Jeff Kodosky, National Instruments cofounder and business and technology fellow, known as the ‘Father of LabVIEW.’

“For a long time we focused on making additional things possible with LabVIEW, rather than furthering the goal of helping engineers automate measurements quickly and easily. Now we are squarely addressing this with the introduction of LabVIEW NXG, which we designed from the ground up to embrace a streamlined workflow. Common applications can use a simple configuration-based approach, while more complex applications can use the full open-ended graphical programming capability of the LabVIEW language, G.”

National Instruments demonsrated how LabView NXG can acquire benchtop measurement data faster and iteratively analyse that data. “These nonprogramming workflows simplify automation by building the necessary code behind the scenes,” the company explained. “For instance, engineers can drag and drop a section of code equivalent to 50 lines of text-based code.”

LabView NXG will be launched alongside the latest version of the previous platform in LabView 2017. “Whether you are buying LabVIEW for the first time or have been on an active service contract for years, you have access to both LabVIEW NXG 1.0 and LabVIEW 2017,” the company said. It promised to support both and that there will, for example, be a LabView 2018. However, in the future the platforms will be merged, although it did not say when.

New capabilities in Labview 2017 will be aimed at the development, deployment and management of large, complex and distributed test and embedded applications.

“LabView’s code has been around for 30 years and so what we wanted to do was start afresh with a new code base that uses modern tools,” said Kodosky. “That would speed our development too. That was a core reson and there’s a lot of new technology we can take advantage of.”

National Instruments has posted videos of the new LabView software.

 

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