Donald Trump

Trump's Scottish golf course wind farm battle drags on

Presidential republican candidate Donald Trump has brought his long-running battle against the construction of wind farms near his luxury golf courses in Scotland to the Supreme Court.

In early 2014, Trump lost a legal challenge against plans for an 11-turbine European Offshore Wind Deployment Centre which he said would spoil the view from his golf resort near Aberdeen.

"Mr Trump does not want a wind farm one kilometre away from his golf course," Trump's lawyer John Campbell said.

"It was unfortunate that Mr Trump couldn't be here, but he's busy with other things."

Rather than focusing on the potential eyesore that Trump claims would ruin his resort, his legal team instead questioned the validity of the Scottish government's approval of the windfarm, saying their case brought up an important point of law.

The Scottish government's lawyer, James Mure, rejected the arguments, describing one point as "entirely fallacious".

Although the Scottish government gave him the green light to build the 18-hole course and a five-star hotel in 2010, it did not share his opposition to the turbines off Aberdeen Bay.

The project is set to be built three kilometres off the east coast of Aberdeenshire and the government says it would boost the local economy, allow for testing of new technology and power 49,000 homes.

Construction on the wind farm is expected to begin later this year with connection to the grid occurring in 2017.

The Supreme Court's verdict is expected early next year, although Trump has vowed to carry the case on to the European Court of Justice if he fails this appeal.

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