Cafflano Klassic


An Internet of Things eBike, coffee anywhere and faster-than-ever camera shots. Cutting-edge consumer technology arriving today.

Cafflano Klassic


The "world's first all-in-one portable coffee maker". Sure, we've had camping espresso makers (they look like a pressure pump with a coffee pod at the end) before. But this is the first time you can grind, brew and then drink from bean to cup, standing in a field, all from one object. The top part features the tiny grinder. Just put 20g beans into the compartment above the high-quality ceramic mill, select coarseness, then grind. Remove the mill and the coffee will be waiting on the metal filter. Pour in water, wait and savour the results.


From £699

The "first folding, chainless and beacon-enabled e-bike with servicing at your door free of charge," the Jivr is a Kickstarter success. It features a patent-pending internal chainless electric drivetrain, battery to go 16mph for 20 miles (or just use it as a normal pedal bike) and folds small and fast with a 15kg weight. It also comes with an app that lets you navigate, view calories burned and distance, and is iBeacon-enabled - so you can hack it as part of the Internet of Things. Jivr also promise to service or replace your bike free within 48 hours in any large city with enough other Jivr bikes.

Anki Overdrive

From $150

The first iteration of the app-controlled car-racing rival to Scalextric has already been a massive success. Now the company has announced the September launch of its successor. Overdrive adds in modular tracks - track pieces snap together magnetically and are printed with special ink - while new Anki cars are designed to recognise the modular sections. The initial starter kit features eight possible configurations. Expansion packs are promised to take that to 20 including bridges and underpasses, 180-degree bends and "lethal" intersections. Also added are new game modes, enabled by the modular boards - including capture-the-flag style play, cross-platform Android vs iOS play, and jump stunts.

Acer Revo One RL85

From £240

The new breed of living room Windows PC? The Revo One range is absolutely palm-of-hand tiny and affordable, but hits enough spec notes to ensure it'll be usable by most. The bottom-of-the-range Revo One: Intel Celeron dual-core 1.4 GHz processor, 4GB memory, 1TB drive, and 4K video/7.1 sound outputs. There are also expansion bays for extra memory or hard drives in a space that's 155mm high and 106.5mm square. Control is via standard Bluetooth accessories, a neat Acer remote with keyboard on one side, touch-mouse on back or via smartphone app. Higher-spec Revo Ones are also coming for those wanting more serious gaming or video power.

Leatherman Tread

From £140

Available from August, “the world's first wearable multi-tool” is a 17-4 stainless steel link bracelet you can take apart and turn into tools. Twenty-five implements are built into the links, ranging from box wrenches to screwdrivers and a carbide glass breaker (also cutting hook, bottle opener and hex drives). Each link has two or three tools built in, and you can swap and add links to adjust for wrist size, rearrange for utility or to add in newly-released tools. The QM1 variant adds in a Leatherman-designed rugged Swiss-made watch piece, but will cost from £430.

Nikon 1 J5

From £350 (body only)

Its predecessor, the J4 has just won a prestigious Red Dot Design Award for having "the world's fastest high-speed continuous shooting rate with AF tracking". The new J5 adds a few more accolade-worthy ideas on top of retaining that vital "world's fastest" tag. Both use compact system 1 NIKKOR interchangeable lens mounts, both feature 160-12,800 ISO and 20 frames per second with autofocus burst shooting. The J5 ups megapixel count to 20.8, adds 15fps 4K video and a new image processor. Oh, and slow-motion HD video, as well as a tilting LCD screen for selfies to ensure it's bang on trend.

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