The HyperCat consortium is working to create a common language for IoT applications

Hypercat IoT specification receives �1.6m boost

The HyperCat specification for communicating over the Internet of Things will receive £1.6m in funding from the Technology Strategy Board.

The 40 company HyperCat consortium, which includes ARM, IBM, BT and KPMG, is promoting a new specification designed to create a common way for connected devices to communicate with each other, to allow interoperability between different companies’ technology.

The specification is designed to allow applications to autonomously search for data from connected devices across multiple data hubs by creating a common format for the metadata that describes the data resources listed on each hub.

“As new entrants to the IoT market strive to deliver revolutionary solutions at an extraordinary pace, HyperCat will ensure that these players can securely speak a common language,” said Justin Anderson CEO of IoT firm Flexeye, which is leading the consortium.

“The UK has an opportunity now, through HyperCat, to be central to the IoT revolution, levelling the playing field with the ubiquitous American giants and inspiring British industry to deliver £100bn of value by 2020 – Great Britain can grow back its industrial teeth.”

The consortium expects to publish the HyperCat specification as an independent and publicly available standard through the British Standards Institute sometime next year, which they hope will be the first step towards an open, international standard.

Amyas Philips, head of ARM’s internet of things research group, said:  “ARM welcomes news of this funding. Increasing the utility of embedded connected devices will benefit everyone, and the HyperCat consortium has put itself in an excellent position to build momentum for this web-friendly IoT technology.

“ARM looks forward to using that momentum to support the technology's integration into core internet standards.”

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