The hand scanning payment system takes less than five seconds per transaction according to Quixter

Paying for goods with a quick hand scan

Shoppers can now pay for goods with nothing more than their hand thanks to new vein scanning technology.

A new start up called Quixter, the brainchild of Swedish engineering student Fredrik Leifland, has placed terminals in 15 stores and restaurants mainly around the campus of Lund University that can read the unique pattern of vein’s in the hands of 1,600 active users to pay for goods.

The terminal requires the user to enter the last 4 digits of their phone number, simply to give them an opportunity to check the amount on a display before they pay, before scanning their hand to complete the payment and debit their account.

“Every individual's vein pattern is completely unique, so there really is no way of committing fraud with this system. You always need your hand scanned for a payment to go through,” he said.

Leifland got the idea for his start-up two years ago while stuck in a queue at the supermarket. Investigating a quicker way of making payments he and a group of classmates at Lund University discovered biometric solutions, but while vein scanning technology already existed no one hadmanaged to link it to a payment system.

“We had to connect all the players ourselves, which was quite complex: the vein scanning terminals, the banks, the stores and the customers. The next step was finding ways of packaging it into a solution that was user friendly.”

To sign up for the service users visit one of the stores with a terminal, and enter their social security number and phone number. They then scan their palm three times, and subsequently receive a text message with an activation link from the Quixter website where they complete registration by filling in a form with additional information.

While Leifland says other companies are investigating similar technology, Quixter is the first to deploy the system.

 

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