London 2012 aims for greener Olympic games

Carbon emissions on the Olympic build have been cut by 15 per cent, according to London 2012. An expected 1.9 million tonnes of greenhouse gases is expected to have been produced over the seven years of the project - from London winning the biding to the Games taking place. This is after sustainability and reduction measures, according to London 2012 who have billed the Olympics as the most sustainable Games.

Carbon emissions on the Olympic build have been cut by 15 per cent, according to London 2012. An expected 1.9 million tonnes of greenhouse gases is expected to have been produced over the seven years of the project - from London winning the biding to the Games taking place. This is after sustainability and reduction measures, according to London 2012 who have billed the Olympics as the most sustainable Games.

It means that London 2012's carbon footprint amounts to 0.05 per cent of the UK's total emissions. The figures are included in London 2012's Sustainability Plan - Towards a One Planet 2012 - the first time that a summer Games has produced a study projecting its potential carbon footprint. It is seen as a way to look at the possible impact.

Sustainability climate change, waste, biodiversity, inclusion and healthy living are the main issues focused on.

Shaun McCarthy, chair of the Commission for a Sustainable London 2012, the body set up to independently assure London's 2012 pledge to host the most sustainable Games to date and its legacy, described the study as an "honest appraisal of progress to date".

He said: "It is a significant improvement on previous documents in that it provides a rich picture of the huge range of initiatives under way to support the sustainability agenda.

"We accept that Locog (the London organisers) are breaking new ground in the event management sector and that it is impossible to set comparative targets. We believe that Locog are in a position to present greater focus to some of the absolute targets related to the five key themes.

"Specific, outcome-based targets for biodiversity and healthy living would be welcome. More prominence should be given to targets already in place, such as emissions limits for vehicles. We welcome Locog's new commitment to waste diverted from landfill for temporary materials."

Cuts made so far have largely come from progress made by the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA), which is in charge of the Olympic build, in developing the Olympic Park in Stratford, east London, building thousands of new homes, world-class sporting venues, a 102-hectare public park with thousands of trees, as well as new and improved rail and water infrastructure and new pedestrian and cycle routes.

The ODA say it is on track or exceeding sustainability targets on the build

The ODA is currently delivering 60 per cent of materials by weight by rail or water transport, beating a target of 50 per cent, and reducing vehicle movements and the resulting carbon emissions. Up to 90 per cent of construction waste is being diverted from landfill and is being reused or recycled instead, the ODA said.

Upgrading the public transport infrastructure and from Locog's staging activities during the Games is also expected to have an impact on the footprint.

Recent articles

Info Message

Our sites use cookies to support some functionality, and to collect anonymous user data.

Learn more about IET cookies and how to control them

Close