Firms that under-invest in SOA governance will fail

Organisations that under-invest in the Software Oriented Architecture (SOA) governance initiative will fail to reap the long-term benefits SOA offers, according to a report from IT research firm Butler Group.

Organisations that under-invest in the Software Oriented Architecture (SOA) governance initiative will fail to reap the long-term benefits SOA offers, according to a report from IT research firm Butler Group.

SOA Governance suggests that while technology support will be required, this is primarily an organisational issue with the emphasis on putting the right people in the right roles, and giving them the necessary authority to ensure that the architecture design is kept consistent with business aims and requirements.
 
̶0;Most organisations deploying SOA leave it too late to implement effective governance,̶1; warns Rob Hailstone, software infrastructure practice director at Butler Group. ̶0;The longer you leave it, the more difficult it becomes to ̵6;retrofit̵7; governance to an operational SOA environment; however, the effort must be made if the SOA initiative is not to descend into chaos.̶1;
 
The adoption of SOA provides significant potential to improve the value organisations derive from their IT investments, in terms of increased flexibility, improved use of assets, alignment with business objectives, and reduced integration costs.
 
Butler Group̵7;s report deals with the four major phases of the SOA deployment: Planning, Design and Development, Run-time, and Change Lifecycle.
 
While most descriptions of SOA governance focus on the technology-centric run-time environment, this represents just a small part of the overall governance effort, the report advises: the ideal time for an organisation to commit to SOA governance is right at the start of the SOA initiative, by establishing the design authorities for the services and other artefacts to ensure that disruptive ownership issues are minimised.

̶0;One of the disruptive aspects of SOA that is often missed in early projects is that all resources in a SOA need to be shared, and this means traditional budget-holder ownership models are a very poor fit ̵1; leading to much frustration further down the line,̶1; adds Butler Group̵7;s Rob Hailstone.

Further information: www.butlergroup.com.

Image: the longer you leave it, the more difficult it becomes to ̵6;retrofit̵7; governance to an operational SOA environment, warns Butler Group.

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