Employee trafficking of large files is placing organisations at risk

The methods some employees are using to transfer large files are putting organisations at serious risk of data leakage and possible malware contamination, backup firm DVS is warning

Third-party Web transfer services, instant messaging and even social networking sites - often used by employees to send corporate data - are just as insecure.

Most employees use external services in the belief that it is helping them be more efficient in doing their job and are not intentionally putting their employer at risk, believes Andy Hansen, sales manager of DVS Soft Distribution: "Aside from the increased risk of information theft or a delivery mistake by the postal company, there is also the distinct possibility that the file or the site it is hosted on may be compromised by malware."

Hansen added: "Restricted by email attachment size - and even file formats - ever-resourceful employees are finding other ways to transfer large files and most of them are even more insecure than email; typical files will include sales information, market projections, confidential pitches and competitive analysis - not the sort of information most businesses want in the open."

Hansen believes that one of the problems is that businesses have restricted the employee's ability to send large files over email, without recognising that they still need to be able to get that information to partners and customers. Email inbox-capacity caps exacerbate the problem and drive staff towards increased use of external email services.

Further information: www.dvssoft.co.uk

Image: Most employees use external services in the belief that it is helping them be more efficient in doing their job

What do you think about the issues raised in this news story? Share your views at the Information Professional discussion forum.

More IT industry news from the IET

Recent articles

Info Message

Our sites use cookies to support some functionality, and to collect anonymous user data.

Learn more about IET cookies and how to control them

Close