Engineering marvels turned into Lego

7 January 2014
By Tereza Pultarova
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A model of the fusion reactor ITER made of nearly 500 Lego bricks

A model of the fusion reactor ITER made of nearly 500 Lego bricks [Credit: Lego]

Nasa's iconic Martian rover Curiosity won the 2012 round and already has its commercially available Lego model

Nasa's iconic Martian rover Curiosity won the 2012 round and already has its commercially available Lego model [Credit: Lego]

Technology rules in the Lego Cuusoo competition, this is the latest winner

Technology rules in the Lego Cuusoo competition, this is the latest winner [Credit: Lego]

The Apollo 11 landing module is one of the current front runners in the Lego Cuusoo competition

The Apollo 11 landing module is one of the current front runners in the Lego Cuusoo competition [Credit: Lego]

Apple store made of Lego

Apple store made of Lego [Credit: Lego]

The not yet built giant fusion reactor ITER has recently entered a competition to have its own miniature model created as a commercially available Lego set.

Introducing his idea at the Lego Cuusoo website, started by Lego in 2008, graphic designer Andrew Clark has proposed a model of the ITER fusion reactor, set to become the biggest in the world, made of 498 Lego bricks including two micro figures for a sense of scale and detail.

Since the end of December 2013, people can vote for the Lego ITER model to help it get from paper to reality. If it reaches 10,000 votes until May 2014, it will be considered by the Lego team for manufacturing.

It is not the first technology marvel competing at the Lego Cuusoo website. In 2012, NASA’s Martian rover Curiosity received the highest amount of votes and is already commercially available. The latest winner, selected in the autumn of 2013, is an exoskeleton suit for a tiny Lego man.

Among the current frontrunners are also several technology-inspired projects – for example a Lego Apple Store and the Apollo 11 lunar lander created in the memory of the deceased first man on the Moon Neil Armstrong. Both projects are nearing the 10,000 vote milestone, making them eligible for further consideration.

Authors of successful designs receive 1 per cent of the royalties.

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