Anti-corrosive paint could 'remove production stage'

18 February 2013
By Edward Gent
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A researcher demonstrates the application process for the new paint

A researcher demonstrates the application process for the new paint

A new type of paint with improved protection against metal corrosion could “remove a production stage” for manufacturers.

The coating, developed by researchers at the Universitat Jaume I de Castellón in Spain, provides enhance protection due to its improved adherence to metal surfaces.

To date, most industrial options to protect metals against corrosion have required an initial print or pre-treatment that involves, in most cases, either metal cleaning and corrosion or adding another paint layer.

But the new paint employs three chemically different pathways which interact to increase adherence of the paint to the metal substrate while simultaneously boosting anti-corrosive properties to provide protection with a single layer that is as good as when a pre-treatment is used.

The idea of the project, says researcher José Javier Gracenea, "is to avoid this pre-treatment and remove a production stage and all that comes with it in terms of time and money, since the metal preparation always involves an additional phase and expensive".

He added: "We are currently working with aluminium, steel and galvanized steel as they mean 99 per cent of industrial metals used.

“For example, aluminium is used for all types of metal work, steel is present in most appliances and galvanized steel is chosen for manufacturing poles or lampposts."

Researchers say the paint should work for all metals and it is expected to be on the market within two years – with its use saving about 20 per cent in production costs.

The project has been developed in conjunction with firm Mediciones y Corrosión (Medco), located in Espaitec, the University's Science and Technology Park, as part of Impact, a Spanish Ministry of Economics and Competitiveness scheme that seeks to promote cooperation between companies and research centres.

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